Dog Vaccinations

Dogs should be vaccinated yearly against a number of deadly diseases.

Puppies and kittens need extra vaccinations at a young age, followed by yearly boosters. When your pet comes in for a vaccination they will receive a full health check by one of our vets. We can only vaccinate a healthy animal.

Dogs are routinely vaccinated against:

  • Distemper (Canine Distemper Virus is a morbillivirus within the Paramyxoviridae family. It is a contagious and often fatal disease with respiratory, gastrointestinal and central nervous system manifestations. It is seen very rarely nowadays as widespread vaccine programme prevents infection and disease).
  • Hepatitis (Infectious Canine Hepatitis is caused by Adenovirus Type 1. It causes many different clinical symptoms but mainly affects the liver and eyes. Damage to the eyes can lead to the classic “hepatitis blue eye”. Vaccination proves highly effective).
  • Parvovirus (Canine Parvovirus is characterised clinically by inappetence, vomiting, diarrhoea and weight loss. Severe disease can lead to sepsis, multiorgan failure and death. Vaccination has been effective at drastically reducing disease incidence although cases are still reported).
  • Parainfluenza (Canine Parainfluenza is one of the diseases that causes Infectious Canine Tracheobronchitis. More recently it is also being referred to as Canine Cough. It causes varying degrees of a dry hacking type cough and is most serious in young puppies and older debilitated animals. It is highly contagious. The vaccine is not always preventative but will generally reduce the severity and length of the clinical signs).
  • Leptospirosis (L.icterohaemorrhagiae and L.canicola are the most common types of this bacterium although more types/serovars are constantly evolving. This bacterium targets the kidneys and the liver and results in a multitude of clinical signs. The prognosis is guarded in severe cases. This bacterium is often carried by rats and mice so dogs drinking contaminated water or swimming in river, lakes or canals commonly come in contact with this bacterium.
  • Bordetella Bronchiseptica = Kennel Cough predominantly cause by this organisms: This bacterium is the major contributor of kennel cough. This vaccination should be given approximal 2 weeks before a dog is being kennelled or travelling. It causes varying degrees of a dry hacking type cough and is most serious in young puppies and older debilitated animals. It is highly contagious and takes a considerable time with treatment to recover. The vaccine is not always preventative but will generally reduce the severity and length of the clinical signs. This is a different type of vaccination as it is given nasally.

We recommend puppies to have their first vaccination at 6-8 weeks of age with a second injection 2-4 weeks later. Yearly boosters are needed to keep your dog healthy and safe.

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